Scullery

Employees at The Scullery pose for a photo inside the restaurant.

The Scullery Coffeehouse and Creamery, located at 431 Evans St., reopened its dining area to customers yesterday after being temporarily closed due to COVID-19 restrictions.

As the restaurant opened for dine-in yesterday, it enforced new restrictions on seating, and will continue to be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., according to Jacob Adkins, an employee at The Scullery.

The restaurant has continued business during stay-at-home orders with curbside pickup.

A gofundme page, named “We love The Scullery,” was organized by Jill Camnitz to bring support to The Scullery staff members and owners. The goal was $6,000, which was met. The gofundme was created on May 27, according to the gofundme page.

Matthew Scully and his wife Erin Scully own the restaurant which serves “fresh roasted coffee, home made ice creams, delicious food prepared with fresh locally sourced ingredients,” according to its Facebook page.

The restaurant was closed for three weeks at the start of the stay-at-home order, which first began on March 30, Scully said. During Phase 2 of reopening, which started on May 22, the restaurant began to offer take-out to customers.

Scully said he and the staff are prepared for customers to come back and enjoy the dining area as safely as possible. Scully encourages guests to wear a face mask when they dine-in.

The restaurant set up sanitizing stations for guests when they come into the dining area, Scully said. He said he will have employees working just to make sure that everything is sanitized at least once every hour.

Scully said the staff will have guests wait in their cars until a table is open and has been cleaned after each guest to ensure a safe distance between them, then a hostess will give them a call when the table is ready. He said the bathrooms will be cleaned after each guest as well.

Old windows were installed at the bar and registers as a barrier between the guests and the cashiers, Scully said.

“Right now, we are able to help pay people to stay home. We don’t have a paid leave program like a lot of businesses do, but I am just trying my best to take care of people to encourage them to stay home when they are sick,” Scully said.

Jim McConnell, an East Carolina University alumnus, said in an email statement that he thinks most businesses and organizations are in a tough position and he thinks that there is really no “right time” to reopen.

“The Scullery was proactive right from the beginning trying to help channel their unused food supplies to people in the community who needed it and I believe they have the best interests of their patrons and the Uptown Greenville community at heart. They’ve made adaptations to their physical space and practices and I wish them the best,” McConnell said in an email statement.

Karringtyn Russell, an ECU alumnus with a Bachelor of Science in Fashion Merchandising, said the Scullery has been her favorite food spot since she was in college. Russell said she loved the atmosphere and the coffees and milkshakes are unique.

Russell said she believes that The Scullery secured a specific and special niche in Greenville, North Carolina.

“Customers are ready to welcome their food with open arms,” Russell said in an email statement. “COVID affected this community deeply and I’m excited to see places and people working to get back to normal. I’m thrilled to be able to drink my coffee there again and enjoy sitting in the center of Uptown.”

 More information about The Scullery reopening can be found on its Facebook page.

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